15 Aug

Youth Realities – tackling the taboo of youth domestic violence

 

We are always pleased to see new organisations coming through to support young people, especially in the issues some organisations in the youth sector are too afraid to touch on. Youth Realities have arrived, with their launch event happening on September 3rd, in London and we are very proud to call them our friends. At this time of year – with people moving away and starting new chapters in their lives, youth domestic violence can be particularly prevalent. Here are some words from their founders, telling you more about the work they do and why:

“Statistics show 1 in 5 young people, aged 16-24, experience domestic violence from their partner- this statistic is wrong. 1 in 5 young people, experienced domestic violence and reported it.
There are thousands of young people across the UK, younger than the legal government definition of domestic violence even recognises, suffering silently, not knowing how to feel or where to go for help.
For those that do courageously seek help from the police and other authorities, research has shown it takes an average of 35 physical assaults before the victim even makes their first report. This is an extremely sad and frighteningly high number.
Domestic violence is already a taboo topic. For young people, often those who are overwhelmingly indulged in their first take of love, or have grown up in a household normalising abusive behaviour, getting caught up in a cycle of abuse is extremely difficult to break away from.
There has been improvement with the social and legal understanding of youth domestic violence recently in the UK. In 2012 the government extended the definition of Domestic Violence to include those aged 16, and ‘coercive control’. The NSPCC also set up a young people’s panel to engage the opinions of the youth in the governments work on tackling domestic violence.
It’s not just the government and other organisations that can help make this change, you can too!
It’s always important to keep an eye out for signs of abuse, especially as a young person, a professional working with young people, or a parent. There are always signs, the main one being the attempt to hide them! Be cautious of secretive behaviour, isolation from a usual friendship group or common social activities, a sudden drop in standards of appearance, and a drastic change in clothing that may be to hide bruising or other marks.
Youth Realities, a youth led organisation tackling teenage abusive relationships, is on a mission to drastically reduce youth domestic violence through education, empowerment and opportunity. Raising awareness of the issue, and the root causes that created it.
We are always looking for passionate and driven young people to join our team! To get involved contact us through social media @Youthrealites / @Youth_Realities, or email youthrealities@gmail.com.”

01 Dec

World Aids Day

We are delighted to hear the news today that Vaccines are currently being tested in Africa and fully support the world campaign to eradicate HIV by 2030. The youth of today need to know this is a reality that their generation could achieve, so we must talk to them about this difficult and sensitive topic to overcome the stigmas and misconceptions.

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It is alarming to hear so many young people talk so flippantly about not using a condom because they use “other forms of contraception”. The ignorance surrounding STIs is still very apparent in the younger generation despite having access to a world of resources on the web so we must get them talking about it – no matter how red faced this makes us or them!

We hope this quick and easy resource will help. If you want us to come to your school or college and talk to your young people about sexual health send us a message via our contact form or on our social media.

World Aids Day

A quick and easy Powerpoint, perfect for assembly or tutor time to get young people thinking and talking about HIV. The link to the Quiz helps address some common misconceptions and stigmas surrounding HIV and Aids.